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Massachusetts Medical Society Calls for Large-Scale Research on Medical Marijuana

The oldest state medical society in the U.S. is urging medical and scientific communities to conduct large-scale clinical trials to determine the safety and effectiveness of marijuana for medical use.

Last year, the Massachusetts Medical Society (MMS) opposed a medical marijuana ballot question due to the absence of large-scale clinical trials on the drug’s safety and effectiveness in treating medical conditions. But in October 2012, MMS President Dr. Richard V. Aghababian sent a letter to the  U.S. Drug and Enforcement Administration, requesting the agency to change the current classification of marijuana “so that its potential medicinal use by humans may be further studied and potentially regulated by the Food and Drug Administration.”

On Feb. 7, the DEA responded to Dr. Aghababian’s letter, saying research on Schedule I substances are allowed “provided that the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has determined the researcher to be qualified and competent and the research protocol to be meritorious.” Therefore, if the researchers meet those criteria, they are required to obtain a registration to begin their study on a Schedule I controlled substance, which in this case is marijuana.

“DEA has never denied a research registration for marijuana and/or THC if the Secretary of the HHS has determined that the applicant is qualified and competent and the research protocol is meritorious,” the DEA said in the letter. “Currently, there are active researchers registered with DEA to perform research with marijuana, marijuana extracts, and marijuana derivatives such as cannabidiol and cannabinol.”

Given the information, Dr. Aghababian is now encouraging researchers to “identify all  treatment protocols that would apply to a standard pharmaceutical therapy, including indications, contraindications, dosages, length of therapy, side effects, and more.”

Tags: legalizing marijuana, medical marijuana, medical marijuana legalization, research on marijuana, research on medical marijuana
March 15, 2013 at 12:00 am
7 comments »
  • March 15, 2013 at 8:41 pmPaul Hurteau

    “ACP strongly supports exemption from federal criminal prosecution; civil liability; or professional sanctioning, such as loss of licensure or credentialing, for physicians who prescribe or dispense medical marijuana in accordance with state law. Similarly, ACP strongly urges protection from criminal or civil penalties for patients who use medical marijuana as permitted under state laws.”.

    American College of PhysiciansSecond-Largest Physician Group in the United States.

  • March 15, 2013 at 8:42 pmPaul Hurteau

    “[The APHA] encourages research of the therapeutic properties of various cannabinoids and combinations of cannabinoids, and…urges the Administration and Congress to move expeditiously to make cannabis available as a legal medicine.”.
    American Public Health AssociationOldest and Most Diverse Organization of Public Health Professionals in the World.

  • March 15, 2013 at 8:43 pmPaul Hurteau

    “The evidence demonstrates a connection between therapeutic use of marijuana and symptom relief. The American Nurses Association actively supports patients' rights to legally and safely utilize marijuana for symptom management and health care practitioners' efforts to promote quality of life for patients needing such therapy.”.
    American Nurses AssociationRepresenting America's 3.1 Million Nurses.

  • March 15, 2013 at 8:47 pmPaul Hurteau

    “Our American Medical Association (AMA) urges that marijuana's status as a federal Schedule I controlled substance be reviewed with the goal of facilitating the conduct of clinical research and development of cannabinoid-based medicines.”.

    American Medical AssociationThe Largest Association of Medical Doctors in the United States.

  • March 15, 2013 at 8:48 pmPaul Hurteau

  • March 15, 2013 at 9:18 pmPaul Hurteau

    Q: Who killed more Americans —al Qaeda with hijacked airplanes on 911, or Merck with Vioxx?
    A: Merck, by a factor of 18.

    http://cannabisclinicians.org/2011/the-vioxx-settlement/

  • March 15, 2013 at 9:23 pmPaul Hurteau

    Bold faced lie!
    ________________________________________________________

    “DEA has never denied a research registration for marijuana and/or THC if the Secretary of the HHS has determined that the applicant is qualified and competent and the research protocol is meritorious,” the DEA said in the letter. “Currently, there are active researchers registered with DEA to perform research with marijuana, marijuana extracts, and marijuana derivatives such as cannabidiol and cannabinol.”.

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