Testing It Up

Multiple Sclerosis Treatment: Another Breakthrough For Medical Marijuana?

Growing popularity of legalizing the use for medical marijuana seems to have created another breakthrough with the latest discovery that it could lead to relieving patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS).

medical marijuanaThis latest development was published in the journal Neurology, and is based on a review made by a team of researchers from the American Academy of Neurology who conducted the study on the effects of using medical marijuana. However, according to a report from The Boston Globe, they immediately dismissed the effects of marijuana to give relief of Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy or seizures.

Dr. Barbara Koppel, who heads the study and is a neurologist from New York Medical College in New York, disclosed that the marijuana plant contains cannabinoids, which provide relief of multiple sclerosis and with fewer side effects than tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary component that causes the feeling of being high. However, it was suggested to take the compound in a pill or spray form rather than smoke it, because it is harder to measure the exact amount of active compound that the patient could get when inhaled.

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society welcomes this new development and puts its support on the basis of fulfilling the rights of MS patients who want to try medical marijuana. They also advised their members to coordinate with health providers in accessing marijuana because it was not specifically determined in the study if smoking marijuana is helpful or safe for the treatment of MS.

May 9, 2014 at 1:00 am Comments (0)

Marijuana May Relieve Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

A recent study provides evidence that smoking pot will help alleviate symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis.

A new critical trial indicates that smoking marijuana helps relieve painful muscle cramping experienced by people with multiple sclerosis. The study, which was published on Monday, determined that 30 MS patients with muscle “spasticity” experienced relief after a few days of marijuana smoking.

Researchers warned, however, that the study did not evaluate whether the benefits derived from smoking pot outweigh the disadvantages.

Dr. Jody Corey-Bloom of  the University of California – San Diego, lead researcher of the new study, shared: “We’ve heard from patients that marijuana helps their spasticity, but I think a lot us thought, ‘Well, it’s probably just making you feel good… I think this study shows that yes, (marijuana) may help with spasticity, but at a cost.”

The cost that Dr. Corey-Bloom is referring to, as determined by her and her team, is that smoking may cause fatigue and dizziness in some users, and generally slowed down people’s skills soon after using marijuana.

Corey-Bloom shared further that it is not clear whether marijuana use would have long-term consequences.

Nicholas LaRocca, vice president of healthcare delivery and policy research at the National MS Society, shared: “The issue of treating spasticity is certainly an important one… Spasticity is a big problem for many people with MS, and the current medications don’t necessarily work for everyone. But smoking marijuana does not appear to be a long-term solution, because of the cognitive effects.” LaRocca was not involved in the study.

May 16, 2012 at 3:24 am Comments (0)