Medical Marijuana

National Academy of Sciences Says Marijuana Has Medical Benefits

medical marijuana has therapeutic benefits

A comprehensive review of the National Academy of Sciences revealed that marijuana does possess medical benefits.

The committee who conducted the review concluded that patients who were treated with cannabis or cannabinoids are likely to experience a huge decrease in pain symptoms. In adults suffering from multiple sclerosis-related muscle spasms, temporary use of oral cannabinoids led to a marked improvement in their condition, according to a news release.

With medical cannabis gaining ground in the United States, the Institute of Medicine conducted a comprehensive review in 1999. This was not, however, the first attempt in trying to determine the potential benefits of marijuana. In 1982, it was concluded that cannabis and its variations have shown value in treating various disorders. Among the conditions where cannabis offers medicinal benefits include asthma, seizures, and other nervous system disorders.

The first attempt by the government to control the use of pot was commissioned by then New York mayor Fiorello La Guardia in response to the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937. The LaGuardia report concluded that pot did not have any effect on a person’s sensibilities or decision-making ability.

Former U.S. President Richard Nixon also commissioned a scientific assessment of marijuana in the early 1970s. Commissioned by Nixon, the Schaefer Report came up with the conclusion that cannabis does not rank high in social problems in contemporary America.

There is a huge difference in the landscape of cannabis in 1999 and 2016. Currently, medical marijuana is legal in 28 states (as of this writing), while 16 states have CBD laws. Last summer, the DEA did not reschedule marijuana, which means that it has no medical value.

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